11 Dec 2017

Roy Moore's Broken Oath
Amending our Constitution is very difficult (as it should be), but 17 Amendments have been ratified since the Bill of Rights was ratified in 1791. Some of them are rather integral to our democracy, and valued across the political spectrum, but apparently Roy Moore thinks getting rid of all 17 would "eliminate many problems". Moore's Troubling Interview with Blight Wing Conspiracy Theorist A few years back, Roy Moore went on a controversial radio program and said some rather disturbing things. This radio host believes not only in a range of conspiracy theories that place him, along with Moore, squarely in what I call the 'blight wing' (the very worst elements of the extreme right), but he even thinks a Constitutional Amendment should be passed that would erase all of the Amendments past the first ten / Bill of Rights. Sorry ladies - no vote for you, and what could possibly be wrong about getting rid of the ban on slavery...? Roy Moore, who had...

06 Apr 2011

Scott Brown was elected to the Senate last year as a darling of the Tea Party.  Since then, they haven’t been that pleased with him because he turned out to be far moderate than they expected (a moderate Republican from Massachusetts?  Who would have thought?) He’s certainly not going to get love from the Tea Party for his latest act: blasting the GOP leadership and by extension, the Tea Party for “irresponsible cuts” that will hurt the poor.  Here’s some of what he said in a letter and also on the Senate floor: Our collective work begins by having a clear understanding of the seriousness of our budget crisis and what is at stake if we fail to address it.  We can all agree that we simply cannot continue on this reckless, unsustainable course.  Reducing and eliminating needless spending and programs are appropriate, but a wholesale reduction in spending, without considering economic, cultural, and social impacts is simply irresponsible. We must a...

04 Apr 2011

The only Republican that I see as having a real shot against Obama next year, unless something huge game changer comes along, is just starting to see some polling done on him. The pattern among them is a low disapproval rating, with a slightly higher approval rating, leaving the vast majority saying they don't have an opinion. He's never been in the national news much, so this isn't a surprise. What it means, though, is that Huntsman has yet to be defined. Every candidate has a brand, and that brand is often picked up quickly as they come into the scene. Like a first impression in an interview, if an underdog candidate like Huntsman wants to have a shot, he has to try and control his first impression as much as possible. If he's lucky, his opponents won't take him seriously and give him time. If the the rumors that he has a serious network of donors through his father's political connections end up panning out, he could spend big early and try...

02 Apr 2011

Steve Ball has a great post on over at Frum Forum, talking about how the "true believers" on the right wing of the republican tent are setting themselves, and the country, up for failure. The silver lining of all this is they might just push more people towards the center. A taste: Why are Republicans doing this to themselves? If the GOP “true believers” continue to substitute nonsense for substance, they will do exactly the opposite of what they have set out to do.  Eventually, they will isolate themselves, force the Republican leadership to make common cause with the moderate and conservative Democrats in both Chambers, and allow a true bi-partisan centrist landscape to develop in Congress. That result—a true example of unintended consequences—would be good for the country and good for fiscal policy.  Such a center, moving on its own without official endorsement of the leadership of either party or body, might actually begin to regain tr...

11 Feb 2011

The Tea Party Express has now named four U.S. senators it intends to work to defeat next year, and their selections might well spark an opposing response from No Labels. Maine's Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe and Michigan's Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow were added yesterday to a list that includes Nebraska's Democratic Sen. Ben Nelson and Indiana's Republican Sen. Richard Lugar. The four would commonly be characterized as "moderates" but in the eyes of Tea Party members they are anything but. Moderates, on the other hand, are exactly the sort of politician that the non-partisan No Labels organization intends to support come primary season in 2012. No Labels argues that the party extremes on the left and right have captured the nominating process and put up candidates that the main body of the electorate do not support. No Labels has announced its intention to hold a 'National Day of Action' next year, and to work to support moderates chall...

09 Jan 2011

It's really only true purists who see Dick Lugar as a moderate. He's certainly no right winger by any means, but he's a mainstream conservative - who just happens to be willing to compromise, instead of being a partizan zealot That just doesn't appear to be good enough for the GOP anymore. From the Indianapolis Star, talking about a meeting between Lugar and several Tea Party groups: Lugar met with Boyer and other tea party supporters for two hours in December to try to convince them he shares their conservative values. It didn't change any minds. "He was a very nice gentleman, very polite," Boyer said. But, she said, far from convincing them to drop any challenge, "it actually gave us strategy on how we're going to address the battle ahead. . . . It was almost like when you begin a ballgame and you shake hands, and we know what we have to do now." ... Indiana Republican Party Chairman Eric Holcomb defended Lugar, saying he and the rest...

30 Nov 2010

How much more of a pounding do moderate Republicans need before they realize they aren't welcome in their own party anymore? From Sean Lengell at the Washington Times: Conservative lobbies are pressing House Republicans to keep centrists from controlling key congressional panels, as House GOP leaders gather this week to pick committee leaders for the 112th Congress. FreedomWorks has launched a public campaign against Michigan Rep. Fred Upton, who wants to lead the House Energy and Commerce Committee, saying he hasn't done enough to cut federal spending and has sided too often with Democrats. And a coalition of more than 20 conservative groups has opposed California Rep. Jerry Lewis' bid to become the top House appropriator, saying he has "thwarted many efforts to rein in ever increasing appropriations bills, to cut or scale back wasteful and duplicative programs, or to accept any meaningful reforms." Just more evidence that my prediction ...