22 Nov 2017

banner for term limits post
The argument for term limits is one of those rare cases that you can accurately apply the label of 'transpartisan'. For as long as I can remember, since I began engaging in political activity in the late '90s, polls have shown a super-majority of US citizens - myself very much included - support this idea, but apparently scientific studies in recent years now lend objective, measurable credence to the old truism that 'power corrupts'.  Research Shows Keeping Power for Long Dulls Empathetic Neural Processing A wonderful long-read article on the subject, by Jerry Useem at The Atlantic, outlines several lines of research that all point to the conclusion that there is a strong correlation between the collection of power (be is political, social, economic, etc) and a range of negative behaviors. These negative behaviors aren't merely bad habits, but - according to the evidence collected - stem from measurable neural impairment. That's right - powe...

12 Mar 2011

RotC commentator _will_ in the comments to a post here at RotC gave a link to a post by Brink Lindsey. In 2007, Mr. Lindsey wrote this: "To be a partisan is, by definition, to see the world partially rather than objectively: to identify wholeheartedly with the perspectives of one particular group and, at the extreme, to discount all rival perspectives as symptoms of intellectual or moral corruption." Does that sound vaguely familiar? The sentiment Mr. Lindsey expresses is clear; Ideological partisans cannot objectively see the whole of reality. Where does the distortion come from? Political and/or religious ideology. And, if ideologues cannot see reality for what it is, then how effective and efficient would you generally expect their policies to be? Is it fair and/or reasonable to believe that policies grounded in ideology will generally be less effective and efficient compared to policies from non-ideological people who can look more objectiv...