25 Sep 2018

There is a long list of pervasive problems in the political press, and we'll go into different facets in future posts, but two false stereotypes related to centrists and pragmatists in the Democratic Party have gotten to the point where they've become a problem in need of a fact check and thorough debunking. Some in the media have been spreading the blatantly false narrative that, in the Democratic tent, you're either a progressive, or an establishment centrist. The problem with this is that the proverbial map doesn't match the territory - the reality being that the Democratic Party leadership struggle is between liberals and progressives, with the shrinking minority of moderates left in the party not having nearly enough votes to have any chance of leading the party. Dem Power Struggle Not Centrists vs Progressives This misconception is bizarre, as centrist observers and activists - many of us being ex-Democrats because of things like this - kno...

20 Jan 2011

With President Obama reinvigorated and the Republicans also feeling strengthened,  we now have "two really powerful forces coming together at the same time at this State of the Union thinking about what the agenda is for the next two years. What better place is there to see if these two rival teams can, in effect, find common ground? That's what gives special poignancy to this State of the Union." Speaking Monday on the weekly No Labels leader's call, David Gergen, advisor to four presidents, offered this assessment and argued that "The country is at a major inflection point. We can continue to do politics as we have in the past and this country will be in serious danger of decline. Or we can change the way we do our politics and we have a real opportunity to renew ourselves." Gergen applauded the growing move to have party members sit together for the State of the Union address as having symbolic importance in showing a willingness to work toge...