02 Apr 2011

Steve Ball has a great post on over at Frum Forum, talking about how the "true believers" on the right wing of the republican tent are setting themselves, and the country, up for failure. The silver lining of all this is they might just push more people towards the center. A taste: Why are Republicans doing this to themselves? If the GOP “true believers” continue to substitute nonsense for substance, they will do exactly the opposite of what they have set out to do.  Eventually, they will isolate themselves, force the Republican leadership to make common cause with the moderate and conservative Democrats in both Chambers, and allow a true bi-partisan centrist landscape to develop in Congress. That result—a true example of unintended consequences—would be good for the country and good for fiscal policy.  Such a center, moving on its own without official endorsement of the leadership of either party or body, might actually begin to regain tr...

06 Mar 2011

There is a tidal wave of Latino voters that will be entering the electorate in coming years, and this could be an opportunity for centrists to grow even more. The size of this coming tide really is astonishing. From The Atlantic: Of Latinos under age 18 living in the United States, 93 percent are citizens and a half-million of those will reach the legal voting age each year for the next 20 years, said officials of the National Council of La Raza, a leading civil-rights advocacy group for Latinos. That will further enhance the political clout of what is already the largest minority community in the country -- and, NCLR leaders said, produce a backlash against politicians who engage in rhetoric that many Hispanics have come to feel is aimed at them. As poll junkies are aware of, young voters are more liberal than conservative, but even more independent than connected to the democratic party. Latino voters in general have a big problem with republ...

03 Feb 2011

I'm finding an unusual number of good op-eds in local papers today... This one comes from Bill King, at The Houston Chronicle. He's responding to a piece in the New York Times by Krugman, that claims we can't have a more respectable discourse because the country is too diametrically split. For anyone who actually knows their polling, this is a plainly inaccurate thing to say. King does a good job deconstructing this myth, and goes right for the jugular by talking about what is supposedly the most contentious of all... abortion: Krugman analogizes the current debate over the social safety net to the debate over abortion, an issue that he concludes the country has made no progress in resolving. But in fact, the issue has been largely resolved. For a number of years now, the polls indicate that a solid majority of Americans think that abortion is morally wrong, but are unwilling to use the police power of the state to enforce their view except i...

06 Jan 2011

This quote from Gallup sums up recent momentum towards what I call the independent groundswell: Although 2010 brought some major legislative successes for the Democratic majority, it was not a good year for the party politically. In addition to losing control of the House of Representatives and seeing the number of Democratic senators and governors reduced, the party saw its support among the general population drop to tie its 22-year low. However, even as Republicans were enjoying great electoral success, the percentage of Americans identifying with the GOP, the core base of the party, barely increased. Instead, the major movement in American politics since 2008 seems to be away from the Democratic Party and toward independent political status, rather than alignment with the GOP. Still, the Republican Party appeared to capitalize on many independents' frustration with the majority Democratic Party, in much the same way the Democrats capitalized...

05 Dec 2010

It's been a long time since an organized force between the two major parties both had an opening as gigantic as the chasm between them now is currently, and had as many reasons to divest themselves from the major options we have and coalesce around something new. The Reform Party was the most recent, but really the most recent that posed a significant threat (this may have been the case with the Reform Party had Ross Perot not let his ego get in the way of the nomination of Richard Lamm in 1996) was over a hundred years ago, with Theodore Roosevelt and the so called progressive movement (not to be confused with how the word progressive is used today, which now means merely a certain type of liberal who doesn't want to be called such). After a strong showing by former president Teddy Roosevelt, under the banner of the progressive Bull Moose Party, both parties smartly adopted many of the positions of the progressives, and the need for a separat...

27 Oct 2010

I’ve mentioned Eliot Cutler a few times on this blog, I wrote a very flattering profile (I can say my respect for him has only grown since) and have even donated to his campaign… and I’m apparently not alone amongst the chattering masses who cover politics who support his campaign – I just happen to be an early adopter.

Via the Independent Political Report:

Cutler has received a virtual avalanche of endorsements from newspapers across the state in recent weeks, including those of the Bangor Daily News, the Lewiston Sun Journal, the Portland Press Herald, the York Weekly, the USM Free Press, the Portland Phoenix, and the Times Record.

Go Eliot, GO!

08 Jul 2010

Just out of curiosity, I did a quick search to see if my site was listed on Google yet. Not surprisingly it is, as I set up my Adsense account just the other day and saw that Google had crawled my site, but I came across a very nice article, by David Ignatius at the Washington Post, literally titled 'Rise of the Center'. It would make for a good story if I said that I read this way back in November of 2005, and have been looking for the right time to start a blog called this ever since. Its not true, but I might say it at dinner parties just for fun anyway...really though, it almost perfectly explains what this blog is about. For example: "With Tuesday's elections, you could sense a small shift in the polarities that have been tugging Republicans and Democrats toward their bases. All of a sudden the center doesn't look quite so lonely or inhospitable. In fact, it may be regaining its status as the commanding heights of American politics." He...

08 Jul 2010

a lighthouse in front of the Sleeping Giant at Thunder Bay
I was just thinking to myself just now that this is a great week to start a blog that will be tracking the 'rise of the center' (I should name something after that... wait...) of American politics, with all that has been coming out about centrist independents and moderates, but as I wrote those words just now, it occurred to me that this isn't an abnormal week at all. Over the last few months, I've been digging around for high quality centrist and independent bloggers, columnists and organizations, signing up for their email lists, RSS feeds and any other communications they have. What I've found, but is really only now just starting to sink in, is that it isn't so much that there isn't a constant stream of positive news coming out of what I call the 'centrist groundswell', but its that its so spread out that most centrists and moderates don't notice. That's not merely because we don't have a remotely fair number of centrist voices in the media,...

08 Jul 2010

centrist standing alone
Why Start a New Independent Centrist Blog? I launched Rise of the Center to try and debunk myths, fight back against extremism - ideological and otherwise - call out corruption wherever I see it and track the evolution of the emerging rise of the center of the American electorate, from center-right / moderate conservatives, centrist independents and center-left / moderate liberals. There are other centrist independents in the blogosphere and on social media, but not nearly enough. A cursory view of the support among the general populace for the two party system over the last few decades shows a steady move away from the two parties, as they have become more corrupt, influenced by narrow special interests and have moved farther away from the majority of Americans who stand in the center of the political spectrum. But it wasn't until more recently that those who consider themselves unrepresented, or underrepresented, began to coalesce into a polit...