15 Sep 2010

Michael Bloomberg has sure been getting around lately. has The centrist independent mayor from New York City endorsed several candidates, both Democrats and Republicans, and now he's throwing his support behind Rhode Island independent candidate for Governor, Lincoln Chaffee. Both Bloomberg and Chaffee dropped out of the Republican party in 2007, stating that it had moved too far to the right for them to feel comfortable staying there any longer. One can only hope that more centrists, like perhaps moderate Republican Mike Castle or moderate Democrat Evan Bayh, will make similar moves in coming years, as both parties push out their remaining moderate members in one way or another. Bloomberg had to say this,when talking about some of his recent endorsements: “Since I’ve been one of everything in my career at one time or another, I don’t think that party matters,” he said in that interview. “What you want are people who are independent in their ...

26 Aug 2010

(I'm bumping this back up to the top, because I don't think its getting near the attention it should be getting.) This is one of those issues that... one of those VERY few issues... that I can't see a sane person disagreeing with what everyone should agree is just plain the right thing to do. We should all be given the chance to vote, right? Well, a bill was passed not too long ago that said that the states had to mail soldiers serving overseas their ballots at least 45 days in advance. Seems pretty common commonsensical, no? Apparently ELEVEN STATES, and the District of Columbia, have applied for a waiver on this. The list, from Pajamas Media: New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, Maryland, Delaware, Wisconsin, Colorado, Washington, Hawaii, Alaska, and the District of Columbia. The post that Pajamas Media has on this is very thorough. Just head on over there, I'm too pissed about it to write anything worth posting. Read on a...

18 Aug 2010

An old friend of mine, who is a reporter at Reuters, took a good look at the backwards nuclear policy we have in the U.S. and, not surprisingly, found it lacking. Most of it has been around since the 80's, and was a reaction to disasters like Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. These are genuine concerns, but technology has progressed, and instead of finding a way to store sixty thousand tons of nuclear waste, spread out all over the country, we actually have the technology to use that to produce power in a way that eats up some of it in the process. Several energy companies say they have a solution to the waste issue: Recycling, basically squeezing more energy from already-used nuclear fuel while leaving less waste behind. But their efforts face a decades-old policy hurdle that offers them little incentive to pursue the process. This isn't just a fringe idea either. Bill Gates, in his TED speech from last year, broke it down for us in how tech...

13 Aug 2010

Damon Eris, who runs one of my favorite blogs over at Independent Political Report, has posted a great, and fairly thorough, post detailing many of the hurdles that the two major parties have erected to protect themselves from the rising tide of moderate / centrist &  independent discontent. A taste: Predictably, Democrats have challenged the ballot access petitions of numerous Green Party candidates, while Republicans are focused on keeping Libertarian Party hopefuls off the November ballot.  However, such challenges are less an attack on the candidates themselves than they are a slap in the face of the thousands of Americans who signed the petitions to ensure that those candidates will appear on the ballot. (bold mine) The post goes on to show the connections of how third party and independent candidates are ignored in the media, often not included in polls and blocked from participating in public debates. The apparent nonchalance wit...

12 Aug 2010

This snippet from a conversation that Newt Gingrich had with his wife really says it all: He (Newt) asked her (his wife) to just tolerate the affair, an offer she refused. He’d just returned from Erie, Pennsylvania, where he’d given a speech full of high sentiments about compassion and family values. The next night, they sat talking out on their back patio in Georgia. She said, “How do you give that speech and do what you’re doing?” “It doesn’t matter what I do,” he answered. “People need to hear what I have to say. There’s no one else who can say what I can say. It doesn’t matter what I live.” I don't make too many predictions so far off like this... but I'll make the same one that I made when I said that Guiliani would plummet as soon as the GOP primary voting types got to know him more. There will be a plethora of options for Repulicans in 2011/2012. Gingrich can slime like the best of them, but such blatant hypocracy will sink him. Mark my...

04 Aug 2010

I almost just skipped by this post, but it occured to me that this blogger at Townhall - a conservative online haven - has to have some kind of ego to think that he's someone who can give good advice on why moderate swing voters should vote for Republicans this fall. But hey, maybe he'll take off his ideological glasses for a minute and come up with some creative and convincing copy, right? Not so much. He gave six supposed reasons, but none of them actually amounted to reasons to support the Republicans. At best they're just a run-of-the-mill appeal for lesser evilism. I don't buy into lesser evilism. It is one of the major reasons we're in this hyperpartisan mess, and too many centrist swing voters like us are willing to hand over our votes to "evils" of any kind. What we need is exponentially more people who don't sacrifice fundamental principles, no matter where they stand on the political spectrum. But I digress. Let's take a look a...

03 Aug 2010

Some good moderate Republican on 'movement Republican' action going on today. David Frum, the standard bearer of the more logical and reasonable form of consertvatism that is losing power within the republican party, argues that the movement is doing itself a disservice by using labels so obviously false to anyone that actually understands what socialism actually means. Conservatives who fume against the president’s supposed socialism are chasing phantoms: railing against dead ideas while failing to notice the actual gathering dangers to economic liberty and American prosperity. It’s not the red hand of socialism we have to fear. It’s the dead hand of the status quo. The next part is one of the clearest points I've read in a while about how movement conservatism is often contradictory to its own stated goals. In this case, fiscal sanity. In 2009, the US health economy reached a symbolic tipping point: for the first time, more than 50% of ...

26 Jul 2010

There has been quite a bit of chatter the last few days over how Republicans seem to be shooting themselves in the foot by tacking so far to the right. The fervor that is clearly favoring the right continues to lead most observers to predict big gains for the GOP in an upcoming wave election, a probable takeover in the House and likely a comfortable enough margin in the Senate that the Democrats won't be able to peel off enough moderates to overcome filibuster threats without injecting more of what Republicans want into legislation. On the flip side, moving so far to the right is turning off more and more moderates, driving many to even leave the party altogether and causing many to wonder whether the strategy of just riding the disappointment with Obama and not providing real policy solutions that the GOP could push for and campaign on in 2011 and 2012 is charting a course for a sure fire loss in 2012. Fairly moderate Republican, and reasonab...

19 Jul 2010

Washington Watch, a fantastic watchdog organization, has shown the hypocrisy between the talking points of selling the individual mandate, which Obama actually campaigned against when running for president, and how his Justice Department is justifying their right to enforce the law based on a legal standard that allows them to tax. Is there one reality for campaigning about a bill, and another one about the U.S. Constitution? Its jaw-dropping to think that a politician can say one thing so emphatically and walk away from it just a few short months later. This wasn't just a passing comment by Obama during his run in '07 & '08. This was one of the major points that differentiated him from Hillary Clinton. See this Factcheck on a debate between Clinton and Obama that detailed the differences on this. Its disturbing that the press isn't, and didn't, cover this more. His campaign promise to be against the individual mandate just never materialize...

08 Jul 2010

In a recent article, columnist Ari Berman discussed this idea that has been kicked around in the last few years that there is a demographic tidal wave coming that is going to usher in a new age of Democratic, hard left progressive dominance. Quite a few people started to buy into this idea a couple years back, after the 2006 takeover of DC by the Democrats, and the as the Obama campaign phenomenon emerged, but is there any truth to it? Do demographics really determine our political destiny? No.   Hubristically Ignoring Centrist Swing Voters = Pendulum Politics But wait - weren't Republicans saying the same sort of thing just a few years ago? How quickly things turn around, no? Where is that 'red sea, as far as the eye can see'? In short, it led to overblown hubris, and ignoring centrists even more than that did before, which led to a wave election that gave them split government. Yet again, if that sounds familiar, it's probably bec...