15 Aug 2010

Profiles in Independence : Eliot Cutler for Governor of Maine

A local station in Maine has a nice piece on one of the more viable independents running for statewide office this year, Eliot Culter of Maine. Culter is running for Governor, and has a political history that many independents will identify with.

Over the years, Cutler withdrew from Democratic politics after the party, in his view, became too cozy with unions and lost its reputation as a reform party.

He joined the GOP in support of Sen. Peter Mills’ first candidacy for governor, propelled by Democrats’ proposal to borrow $440 million to balance the state budget in 2006. Two years later, Cutler switched back to support Democrat Adam Cote, who lost a six-way primary in the 1st Congressional District.

Now Cutler is an independent.

Most of the most politically passionate independents I’ve known over the years started out with one party or the other. Many of them now say that the party left them and no longer are as welcoming of moderates within their ranks as they used to be, forcing them to decide to try the other major party on for size, or break free altogether.

Also, like other independent races across the country, Culter has a heck of a hill to climb. Independents don’t have that built in network of local groups that can be activated to help them campaign, no established network of donors and its generally harder to get those who have less of a history to vote, volunteer and donate (which is generally the case with independents) to get out.

This being the case, Culter has been shown to be gaining ground in the most recent poll, jumping from seven to fifteen percent of those polled, as of a few weeks ago.

I’ve been watching the news reports coming out of his campaign, and papers in the area covering his campaign, and both like what I see personally, and like what I see organizationally. He’s got a lot of ground to make up, but it appears he’s doing what it’ll take to get there.

For what its worth, he’s got my endorsement. Take a look at his website HERE… I just made a small donation myself. If you like what you see, I’d consider doing the same.

Author Details
After a few years of blogging on other sites, Solomon launched ‘Rise of the Center’ – the precursor to Uniters.org, leading to a number of interviews and freelance opportunities, most notably covering the 2012 election cycle on WNYC.org – the website for the largest NPR station in the country, in New York City – and reported from the floor of the 2012 Democratic & Republican National Conventions. After a hiatus from politics, the horrific circus of the 2016 election, and more generally increasing extremism and corruption, brought him back to this project.
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After a few years of blogging on other sites, Solomon launched ‘Rise of the Center’ – the precursor to Uniters.org, leading to a number of interviews and freelance opportunities, most notably covering the 2012 election cycle on WNYC.org – the website for the largest NPR station in the country, in New York City – and reported from the floor of the 2012 Democratic & Republican National Conventions. After a hiatus from politics, the horrific circus of the 2016 election, and more generally increasing extremism and corruption, brought him back to this project.
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5 thoughts on “Profiles in Independence : Eliot Cutler for Governor of Maine”

  1. I think Cutler is more qualified to say whether he's a Democrat or not. Read about him and you'll find out why he left the party, how he tried being a Republican for a while, and why he's now an independent.

    I'm fine with discussion, and differing opinions, but not hijacking of post comments. Stay on subject Jack, and I wont have to edit your comments in the future. Tangents are one thing, totally changing the subject is another.

  2. The Dems DID totally screw up the stimulus. It should have been a focused jobs creation bill, but while it did some of that, and certainly seemed to have stopped the freefall, a ton of it STILL hasn't been spent, and a ton of it isn't/hasn't been allocated towards things with actual stimulative effect.

    People are pretty zoned in on this. Just like the polling I've seen has said, I'd like to see more done with jobs, but also just as polling I've seen has said, I don't trust the democrats to put together a bill that actually does that well.

    You're right with Crist. Eliot Cutler left the Dems for similar reasons, as did Cahill in MA, and Lincoln Chaffee with the GOP in RI. Its happening on both sides. You just see more on one side because you're looking for it.

    Up until the last few months, it was the GOP that was losing the most support among the general populace, but lately its been the other way around. The pendulum has been swinging back and forth, with both parties one upping each other for the crown of who's the most out of touch with the American people for a generation.

  3. You actually think that centrist types aren't aware of how dirty politics is?

    One of the biggest reasons I hear from people who have given up on both parties is because they're too damn dirty. I think those who have broken free of the parties are *more* sensitive to it, not the other way around. Many who are still within the party seem to be under the impression that its really just the other side that is corrupt… somehow managing to ignore so much evidence showing that corruption knows no bounds of ideology…

    And just in case you think I believe that it doesn't apply to moderates, I offer Ben Nelson (unfortunately MY senator), and Joe Lieberman as examples.

  4. I'm not disagreeing with you, I'm just saying that I think you've got an innacurrate picture of centrists' perception of things if you think we're less aware of the garbage that goes on in gov't. Pick your poison.

    I don't have a problem with moderates caucusing with one side or the other, as long as they're good people and stick to their positions.

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