06 Oct 2010

Deficit Hawks or Deficit Peacocks?

Not more than an hour seems to go by these days without some politician grandstanding for the cause of deficits. Of course, all you have to do is look back a short time, to their actual voting history, to see that nearly all of them are total hypocrites on the matter.

From Politico:

Most often heard from self-described budget hawks, these generic calls for spending cuts never seem to include any specifics. But these “deficit peacocks” all don’t acknowledge that closing the budget gap entirely on the spending side would mean draconian programmatic cuts – cuts that are likely to affect Americans’ daily lives, threaten our health and safety and undermine future economic growth.

This term ‘deficit peacock’ is an excellent moniker for these people. For the most part, the Republicans love to blather on about government waste, cutting taxes and still magically cutting the deficit, even though they spent more and cut taxes, both with more deficit spending, when they were in office. Of course Democrats are no better. They merely cut taxes a bit less, and spend more… again both with deficit spending.

We need a block of representatives that form a “ask not what your country can do for you” caucus. One that will be honest with the American people, telling them that its time we were realistic about the long term costs of our debt and deficits, start accepting gradual cuts in programs and raised taxes in some areas to pay for our generous social welfare programs that will bankrupt us mid century, if we do not make some major changes in the next few years.

Otherwise all we’re doing is stealing from babies. Thats really what it comes down to… the parties that steal from babies, against the “ask not” caucus we so desperately need.

Read more at Politico…

Author Details
After a few years of blogging on other sites, Solomon launched ‘Rise of the Center’ – the precursor to Uniters.org, leading to a number of interviews and freelance opportunities, most notably covering the 2012 election cycle on WNYC.org – the website for the largest NPR station in the country, in New York City – and reported from the floor of the 2012 Democratic & Republican National Conventions. After a hiatus from politics, the horrific circus of the 2016 election, and more generally increasing extremism and corruption, brought him back to this project.
×
After a few years of blogging on other sites, Solomon launched ‘Rise of the Center’ – the precursor to Uniters.org, leading to a number of interviews and freelance opportunities, most notably covering the 2012 election cycle on WNYC.org – the website for the largest NPR station in the country, in New York City – and reported from the floor of the 2012 Democratic & Republican National Conventions. After a hiatus from politics, the horrific circus of the 2016 election, and more generally increasing extremism and corruption, brought him back to this project.
.

3 thoughts on “Deficit Hawks or Deficit Peacocks?”

  1. This is a key counterpoint to all the blithering nonsense from the right about fiscal restraint. They know full well that if they were to start giving specifics about what they would cut, there would be a real nasty backlash. Given that, they won’t say anything about what they want to do. Nor will they accept one shred of responsibility for their share of the catastrophe.

    Nonetheless, real cuts do need to be made. I have spent most of my professional career dealing with a federal agency, federal courts and a few years as a federal employee. I see it up close and personal. It is true that there is a great deal of waste, inefficiency and pursuit of personal agendas at the public's expense. I do believe that some federal agencies and programs should be eliminated or cut significantly, e.g., the NIH, the Agriculture department and some agriculture subsidies, while others need to be expanded, e.g., the enforcement arms of the SEC and the IRS. The problem with that is that cuts like those won't be nearly enough.

    It isn’t just a matter of the $13 trillion federal debt. The real monster is the $40 – $100 trillion in unfunded pension and other federal obligations (http://georgewashington2.blogspot.com/2009/05/dallas-federal-reserve-unfunded-pension.html). Estimates for that debt load are all over the place. Nobody in politics even talks about it because it is so awful. Sooner or later that will need to be acknowledged and dealt with or it will crush us.

Leave a Reply